Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity among subjects with mild airflow obstruction in COPDGene

Journal
Respiratory Medicine
Publisher
Elsevier
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.rmed.2014.07.018
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Medicine
License
Unknown

Abstract

Summary Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by marked phenotypic heterogeneity. Most previous studies have focused on COPD subjects with FEV1 < 80% predicted. We investigated the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in subjects with mild airflow limitation in spirometry grade 1 defined by the Global Initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD 1). Methods Data from current and former smokers participating in the COPDGene Study (NCT00608764) were analyzed. K-means clustering was performed to explore subtypes within 794 GOLD 1 subjects. For all subjects with GOLD 1 and with each cluster, a genome-wide association study and candidate gene testing were performed using smokers with normal lung function as a control group. Combinations of COPD genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with FEV1 (% predicted) in GOLD 1 and in a combined group of GOLD 1 and smoking control subjects. Results K-means clustering of GOLD 1 subjects identified putative “near-normal”, “airway-predominant”, “emphysema-predominant” and “lowest FEV1% predicted” subtypes. In non-Hispanic whites, the only SNP nominally associated with GOLD 1 status relative to smoking controls was rs7671167 (FAM13A) in logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, pack-years of smoking, and genetic ancestry. The emphysema-predominant GOLD 1 cluster was nominally associated with rs7671167 (FAM13A) and rs161976 (BICD1). The lowest FEV1% predicted cluster was nominally associated with rs1980057 (HHIP) and rs1051730 (CHRNA3). Combinations of COPD genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with FEV1 (% predicted) in a combined group of GOLD 1 and smoking control subjects. Conclusions Our results indicate that GOLD 1 subjects show substantial clinical heterogeneity, which is at least partially related to genetic heterogeneity.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times