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Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Two-Component Titanium Alloys after Heat Treatment in the Two-Phase Region (α + Intermetallic Compound) and High-Pressure Torsion

Authors
  • Gornakova, A. S.1
  • Straumal, B. B.1, 2
  • Golovin, Yu. I.3
  • Afonikova, N. S.1
  • Pirozhkova, T. S.3
  • Tyurin, A. I.3
  • 1 Osipyan Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow oblast, 142432, Russia , Chernogolovka (Russia)
  • 2 Chernogolovka Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow oblast, 142432, Russia , Chernogolovka (Russia)
  • 3 Research Institute “Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials”, Derzhavin Tambov State University, Tambov, 392000, Russia , Tambov (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Surface Investigation: X-ray, Synchrotron and Neutron Techniques
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2021
Volume
15
Issue
6
Pages
1154–1158
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S1027451021060082
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
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Abstract

AbstractIn this paper, we measure the nanohardness (H) and Young’s modulus (E) of three alloys: Ti–2.5 wt % Ni, Ti–2 wt % Cr, and Ti–2.2 wt % Fe preliminarily annealed in the two-phase region of the phase diagram (αTi + intermetallic compound) and then subjected to high-pressure torsion. The titanium alloy with the nickel addition showed the highest H and E values, they vary uniformly from the center to the edge of the sample, and the alloy after high-pressure torsion contains two phases: α and ω. The nanohardness of the alloy Ti–2.5 wt % Ni along the sample radius over the surface changes insignificantly: from minimal 4.8 to maximal 5.2 GPa, as does Young’s modulus (from 121 to 155 GPa). The maxima of the H and E values fall in the middle of the sample radius. The alloy Ti–2.2 wt % Fe behaves differently: the presence of four phases α, β, ω, and TiFe leads to a strong scatter in the measured H and E values: from 4.4 to 2.0 GPa and from 131 to 12 GPa, respectively. Processing the P–h diagrams allows the nanohardness of the material to be related to its creep behaviour.

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