Affordable Access

Pharyngeal reconstruction after total laryngectomy with preservation of phonation.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Auris Nasus Larynx
0385-8146
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
12 Suppl 2
Identifiers
PMID: 3836643
Source
Medline

Abstract

The goal of pharyngeal reconstruction after laryngectomy is to prevent fistulization and to permit rapid resumption of satisfactory deglutition. Alaryngeal speech acquisition by the traditional method of esophageal speech is effective if insufflation is rapidly learned and tolerated by the pharyngoesophageal segment. Experience with tracheoesophageal phonation revealed an incidence of pharyngoesophageal spasm in 40% of an esophageal speech failure population which prevented useful air flow for speech production. This is related to esophageal distention and reflexive upper esophageal sphincter hypertension. It is suggested that pharyngeal reconstruction after total laryngectomy may permit higher wall tension than is desirable for speech acquisition. The problem of post laryngectomy pharyngoesophageal spasm may be reduced by myotomy of the pharyngeal constrictors with resultant higher air flows in the residual vocal tract for speech. Alterations in the pharyngeal wall tonicity will affect the pitch of the speech and listener acceptability. Recently identification and division of the pharyngeal plexus has produced a similar result in improved phonatory air flows with subjective vocal pitch approximating more normal voices. The above mentioned techniques are readily applied to the laryngectomy procedure and enhance the likelihood of alaryngeal speech acquisition.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments
F