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Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions of depression after traumatic brain injury: A systematic review.

Authors
  • Liu, Qianqian1
  • Li, Rui2
  • Qu, Wenrui3
  • Li, Bingjin3
  • Yang, Wei3
  • Cui, Ranji4
  • 1 Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory on Molecular and Chemical Genetic, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China; Hand Surgery Department, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China. , (China)
  • 2 Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory on Molecular and Chemical Genetic, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China; Hand Surgery Department, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 3 Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory on Molecular and Chemical Genetic, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China. , (China)
  • 4 Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory on Molecular and Chemical Genetic, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European journal of pharmacology
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2019
Volume
865
Pages
172775–172775
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2019.172775
PMID: 31689413
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) manifest a high incidence of depression, which is associated with an impaired recovery from TBI and a lower quality of life. Several neurobiological changes in patients with TBI contribute a form of depression that is unique to that of general depression. This is evinced by the poor efficacy of antidepressants in treating post-TBI depression relative to general depression. In general, however, the treatment of post-TBI depression has received relatively scattered attention in the literature. The purpose of this review is thus to discuss about the possible pathology of depression following TBI and summarize the recent findings on the treatment of it in clinical studies. While both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches can reportedly attenuate depressive symptoms in patients with TBI to a moderate extent, the various limitations of such studies require that further well-powered, randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and longer follow-ups are warranted to investigate the exact pathophysiology underlying post-TBI depression, the mechanism underlying treatment efficacy, and the optimal pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for this population. A combination of different treatments in a comprehensive therapeutic regimen may be an optimal direction for future research. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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