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Pharmacokinetics of acarbose. Part I: Absorption, concentration in plasma, metabolism and excretion after single administration of [14C]acarbose to rats, dogs and man.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Arzneimittel-Forschung
Publication Date
Volume
39
Issue
10
Pages
1254–1260
Identifiers
PMID: 2610717
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The absorption, disposition, metabolism, and excretion of acarbose (O-4,6-dideoxy-4-[[(1S, 4R, 5S, 6S)-4,5,6-trihydroxy-3- (hydroxymethyl)-2- cyclohexen-1-yl]amino]-a-D-glucopyranosyl- (1----4)-O-a-D-glucopyranosyl- (1----4) -D-glucopyranose, Bay g 5421) have been studied following a single administration of the 14C-labelled compound to rats and dogs via different routes (intravenous, oral, intraduodenal) in the dose range of 2-200 mg.kg-1 as well as to man in a single oral dose of 200 mg. After intravenous administration [14C]acarbose was eliminated rapidly and completely via the renal route. There was no indication for a systemic metabolization of [14C]acarbose. The (renal) clearance for [14C]acarbose was in the range of the glomerular filtration rate. After oral administration [14C]acarbose was very poorly absorbed (1-2% of dose in rats and man and 4% in dogs). Additionally, up to 35% of the radioactivity of [14C]acarbose were absorbed after degradation by digestive enzymes and/or intestinal microorganisms. The delayed and biphasic absorption of the radioactivity strongly influenced the plasma concentration vs time profiles of total radioactivity. Maximum concentrations dependent on the degree of microbial degradation (dog less than rat, man) and on the intestinal transit time were reached at 1.2 h (dogs), 8 h (rats) and 14-24 h (man). The excretion of the radioactivity absorbed occurred rapidly and completely mostly via the renal route.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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