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Personality profiles of Iditarod mushers as compared by finish group.

Authors
  • Dean, G O
  • Dean, N M
  • Turner, A A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Arctic medical research
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1991
Volume
50
Issue
3
Pages
131–137
Identifiers
PMID: 1883420
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study uses a personality profile questionnaire to determine what it is about a person's character that makes them unique to their finish place in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race using data collected from 1988 and 1989. It is the purpose of this study to determine differences in personality that make a musher a top ten finisher as opposed to those who finished in other groups. Mushers were divided into five groups: 1) top ten, 2) 11 to 20, 3) 21 to 30, 4) 31 to last, and 5) scratches. Data was subjected to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Pearson Product-Moment Correlation to determine if any significant distinctions occurred among these groups. A main effect is found in Factor E, Factor F, Factor L, and Factor Q2. In Factor E, Group 1 (top ten finishers) was found to be more aggressive. This group is also more enthusiastic (Factor F). Top mushers are more suspicious and hard to fool (whereas those who finish last are more trusting [Factor L]). Top ten finishers are more group-oriented than the rest of the mushers, inferring that they get along with others and are more helping (Factor Q2). These data suggest that to place in the top ten pack of Iditarod mushers, one must be aggressive, enthusiastic, and calculating.

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