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Persistence of Fear Memory Depends on a Delayed Elevation of BAF53b and FGF1 Expression in the Lateral Amygdala.

Authors
  • Yoo, Miran1, 2
  • Park, Seongwan1
  • Jung, Inkyung1
  • Han, Jin-Hee3, 2
  • 1 Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 KAIST Institute for the BioCentury, KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea [email protected] , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Neuroscience
Publisher
Society for Neuroscience
Publication Date
Sep 09, 2020
Volume
40
Issue
37
Pages
7133–7141
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0679-20.2020
PMID: 32817243
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Endurance represents a highly adaptive function of fear memory and a major cause of maladaptive fear- and anxiety-related mental disorders. However, less is known about the mechanisms underlying the persistence of fear memory. The epigenetic gene regulation recently emerged as an important mechanism for memory persistence. In the previous study, we found that BAF53b, a neuron-specific subunit of BAF chromatin remodeling complex, is induced after auditory cued fear conditioning in the lateral amygdala (LA) and is crucial for recent fear memory formation. In this study using mice of both sexes, we report a delayed induction of BAF53b in the LA 48 h after auditory fear conditioning and its critical role for the persistence of established fear memory. To specifically block the delayed but not the early induced BAF53b function, we used a postlearning knock-down method based on RNAi. The transient knockdown of Baf53b using siRNA in the lateral amygdala 24 h after cued fear conditioning led to specific impairment of remote but not recent memory retrieval. RNA-sequencing analyses identified fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a candidate downstream effector. Consistently, postlearning administration of FGF1 peptide rescued memory persistence in Baf53b knock-down mice. These results demonstrate the crucial role of BAF53b and FGF1 in persistent retention of fear memory, giving insights into how fear memory persistently stored through consolidation processes and suggest candidate target for treating mental disorders related to traumatic memory.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is still unclear how once consolidated memory persists over time. In this study, we report the delayed induction of nucleosome remodeling factor BAF53b in the lateral nucleus of amygdala after fear learning and its crucial role for persistence of established memory beyond 24 h after learning. Our data link the regulation of BAF53b and fibroblast growth factor 1 expression in the amygdala to fear memory persistence. Results from this study open a new direction to understand the time-dependent continuous consolidation processes potentially by a nucleosome-remodeling mechanism enabling long-lasting memory formation and give insights into how to treat mental disorders caused by enduring traumatic memory. Copyright © 2020 the authors.

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