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Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation induces cell cycle arrest via the p53-independent pathway in human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

Authors
  • Chung, Sung Hwa1
  • Onoda, Naoyoshi
  • Ishikawa, Tetsuro
  • Ogisawa, Kana
  • Takenaka, Chiemi
  • Yano, Yoshihisa
  • Hato, Fumihiko
  • Hirakawa, Kosei
  • 1 Department of Surgical Oncology, Institute of Geriatrics and Medical Science, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585, Japan.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Japanese journal of cancer research : Gann
Publication Date
December 2002
Volume
93
Issue
12
Pages
1358–1365
Identifiers
PMID: 12495476
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Outcomes of intensive multimodal therapy have been far from satisfactory. Furthermore, p53 gene dysfunction, often found in this type of cancer, is known to impair the efficacy of the therapeutic agents. Specific ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma) induce growth suppression in some tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the role of PPAR-gamma in anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines (OCUT-1, ACT-1). PPAR-gamma was expressed and functional in both cell lines. Activation of PPAR-gamma with its specific ligands, troglitazone and 15-deoxy-delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2, inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner through inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. P53 protein expression differed in OCUT-1 and in ACT-1, though the levels stayed constant irrespective of ligand exposure in both cell lines. In contrast, p21 and p27 proteins were induced in a dose-dependent manner in both situations. This study showed that PPAR-gamma ligands were able to induce growth suppression in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells via a p53-independent, but p21- and p27-dependent cytostatic pathway. These tumor-suppressive effects of PPAR-gamma may provide a novel approach to the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer.

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