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Peronosclerospora australiensis is a synonym of P. maydis, which is widespread on Sumatra, and distinct from the most prevalent Java maize downy mildew pathogen

Authors
  • Suharjo, Radix1
  • Swibawa, I. Gede1
  • Prasetyo, Joko1
  • Fitriana, Yuyun1
  • Danaatmadja, Yanuar2
  • Budiawan, Ari2
  • Roberts, Sean2
  • Noorhajati, Nanin2
  • Amad, Muhammad2
  • Thines, Marco3, 4
  • 1 University of Lampung, Indonesia, Jl. Prof. Sumantri Brojonegoro I, Bandar Lampung, 35145, Indonesia , Bandar Lampung (Indonesia)
  • 2 PT Syngenta Indonesia, Jl. TB Simatupang No.2 RT 001 RW 005, Cilandak Timur, Pasar Minggu, South Jakarta, 12560, Indonesia , South Jakarta (Indonesia)
  • 3 Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 13, Frankfurt (Main), 60486, Germany , Frankfurt (Main) (Germany)
  • 4 Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, Frankfurt am Main, 60325, Germany , Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Mycological Progress
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Publication Date
Nov 09, 2020
Volume
19
Issue
11
Pages
1309–1315
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11557-020-01628-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

This study was performed to identify Peronosclerospora species found in Indonesia based on sequence analysis of the cox2 gene. In addition, sequence data in total, 26 isolates of Peronosclerospora were investigated in this study. They were obtained from 7 provinces in Indonesia, namely Lampung, Jawa Timur, Jawa Barat, Sumatera Utara, Jawa Tengah, Yogyakarta, and Sulawesi Selatan. Sequence analysis of cox2 and phylogenetic inference were performed on all the 26 isolates. A set of primers developed in this study, PCOX2F and PCOX2R, was used for PCR amplification. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the Indonesian isolates were divided into two groups. Group I contained 13 isolates; 9 isolates obtained from Lampung, 3 isolates from Sumatera Utara, and 1 isolate from Jawa Barat. Group II consisted of 13 isolates; 7 isolates from Jawa Timur, 2 isolates from Jawa Tengah, 1 isolate from Yogyakarta, and 3 isolates from Sulawesi Selatan. All the members of group I clustered with the ex-type sequence of P. australiensis. Meanwhile, all members of Group II formed the sister clade of isolates obtained from Timor-Leste and may represent P. maydis.

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