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Perioperative steroid administration reduces overall complications in patients undergoing liver resection: A meta-analysis

Authors
  • Hai, Hao-Han
  • Aw, Phoebe
  • Teng, Thomas Zheng Jie
  • Shelat, Vishal G
Type
Published Article
Journal
World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Publisher
Baishideng Publishing Group Inc
Publication Date
Sep 27, 2021
Volume
13
Issue
9
Pages
1079–1094
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4240/wjgs.v13.i9.1079
PMCID: PMC8462075
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Meta-Analysis
License
Unknown

Abstract

BACKGROUND Hepatic resection (HR) results in an inflammatory response that can be modified by perioperative steroid administration. However, it remains to be determined if this response's attenuation translates to a reduction in complications. AIM To evaluate if perioperative administration of steroids reduces complications following HR. METHODS A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted on PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to evaluate the effect of perioperative steroid (compared to placebo or no intervention) use in patients undergoing HR. Clinical outcomes were extracted, and meta-analysis was performed. RESULTS 8 RCTs including 590 patients were included. Perioperative steroid administration was associated with significant reduction in postoperative complications [odds ratios: 0.58; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.35-0.97, P = 0.04]. There was also improvement in biochemical and inflammatory markers, including serum bilirubin on postoperative day 1 [MD: -0.27; 95%CI: (-0.47, -0.06), P = 0.01], C-reactive protein on postoperative day 3 [MD: -4.89; 95%CI: (-5.83, -3.95), P < 0.001], and interleukin-6 on postoperative day 1 [MD: -54.84; 95%CI: (-63.91, -45.76), P < 0.001]. CONCLUSION Perioperative steroids administration in HR may reduce overall complications, postoperative bilirubin, and inflammation. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose and duration and patient selection.

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