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Periodontitis and tooth loss have negative impact on dietary intake: A cross-sectional study with stable coronary artery disease patients.

Authors
  • Mendonça, Dayana D1
  • Furtado, Mariana V2
  • Sarmento, Roberta A3
  • Nicoletto, Bruna B4, 5
  • Souza, Gabriela C6
  • Wagner, Tassiane P7
  • Christofoli, Barbara R7
  • Polanczyk, Carisi A2
  • Haas, Alex N7
  • 1 Post-Graduate Program Cardiovascular Science, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 2 Cardiology and Institute for Health Technology Assessment (IATS-CNPq), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Division of Nutrition, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 4 Post-Graduation Program in Medical Sciences: Endocrinology, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 5 Knowledge Area of Life Sciences, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 6 Department of Nutrition and Post-Graduation Program in Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 7 Department of Periodontology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Periodontology
Publisher
American Academy of Periodontology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
90
Issue
10
Pages
1096–1105
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/JPER.19-0036
PMID: 31049952
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Despite the association between cardiovascular diseases and periodontitis, there are scarce data on the impact of oral health in the dietary intake of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the association between dietary intake with periodontitis and present teeth in individuals with stable CAD. This cross-sectional study included 115 patients with stable CAD (76 males, aged 61.0 ± 8.3 years) who were under cardiovascular care in an outpatient clinic for at least 3 months. Dietary intake was recorded applying a food frequency questionnaire previously validated. Periodontal examinations were performed by two calibrated examiners in six sites per tooth from all present teeth. Blood samples were collected to determine serum levels of lipids. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fitted to evaluate the association between dietary outcomes and oral health variables. Individuals with periodontitis had significantly higher percentage of total energy intake from fried foods, sweets, and beans, and also had lower consumption of fruits than those without periodontitis. Presence of periodontitis was associated with lower percentage of individuals who reached the nutritional recommendation of monounsaturated fatty acids and higher blood concentration of triglycerides. Having a greater number of present teeth (≥20 teeth) was associated with higher intake of fibers and total calories. In patients with stable CAD, the presence of periodontitis and tooth loss were associated with a poor dietary intake of nutrients and healthy foods, which are important for cardiovascular prevention. © 2019 American Academy of Periodontology.

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