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Perineurial permeability and endoneurial edema during Wallerian degeneration of the frog peripheral nerve.

Authors
  • Wadhwani, K C
  • Latker, C H
  • Balbo, A
  • Rapoport, S I
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Research
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jul 31, 1989
Volume
493
Issue
2
Pages
231–239
Identifiers
PMID: 2475214
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Perineurial permeabilities to [3H]sucrose and [14C]dextran (MW = 70,000), and water content, conduction velocity (CV) and maximum amplitude (MAP) of the compound action potential, were determined in Wallerian degenerated nerves (sciatic or tibial) of the frog and compared with values in the contralateral uncut nerves. Three days after transection of the lumbosacral plexuses, about 2 cm proximal to the sciatic nerve, mean water content of the sciatic nerve was significantly higher than in the contralateral uncut nerve. After 10 days, the degenerating sciatic nerve showed significant increases in the mean perineurial permeabilities to [3H]sucrose and [14C]dextran when compared to values in the contralateral nerve. Means MAP's and CV's were significantly decreased. At 21 days and after, no compound action potential was detected and perineurial permeability and nerve water content had increased further. Decreases in mean MAP's and CV's and permeability increases of the perineurium were less in degenerating tibial nerves than in degenerating sciatic nerves. It is concluded that following transection, (1) Wallerian degeneration produces an irreversible increase in perineurial permeability, (2) the increase of perineurial permeability follows a proximodistal gradient, and (3) the frog peripheral nerve develops endoneurial edema during Wallerian degeneration as do degenerated nerves of mammals.

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