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Perceptions of social support: comparisons between fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder and fathers of children without developmental disabilities.

Authors
  • Seymour, M1, 2
  • Giallo, R2, 3
  • Wood, C E1
  • 1 Department of Psychological Sciences Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Intergenerational Health Population Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR
Publication Date
Dec 05, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jir.12704
PMID: 31808233
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Research highlights the need for ongoing social support of mothers of children with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Despite recognised differences between mothers and fathers, little is known about the particular social support needs of fathers of children with ASD. Broadly, this study aimed to explore the support needs of fathers of children with ASD compared with fathers of children without a disability (W/OD) and the relation between social support, psychological distress and sociodemographic factors. Drawing from a large, nationally representative community sample of children, 159 fathers of children with ASD were identified, where 6578 fathers of children W/OD were used as a comparison sample. Over 70% of fathers of children with ASD reported that support was inaccessible and were significantly more likely to report so compared with fathers of children W/OD. Emotional/informational social support was the strongest social support domain associated with fathers' experiences of psychological distress. This study provided important insight into the social support needs of fathers of children with ASD. © 2019 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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