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Perceptions and problems of disease in the one-humped camel in southern Africa in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Publication Date
Volume
79
Issue
2
Pages
58–61
Identifiers
PMID: 18846848
Source
Medline

Abstract

The one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) was first introduced to German South West Africa (Namibia) for military purposes in 1889. Introductions to the Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) in 1897 and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) in 1903 were initially with a view to replacing oxen that died of rinderpest. Disease risks attendant on these introductions were recognised and to some extent guarded against. There were, however, relatively few problems. One camel was diagnosed as having foot-and-mouth disease. Mange in camels from India caused some concern as did trypanosomosis from Sudan. Trypanosomosis was introduced into both the Cape of Good Hope and Transvaal. Antibodies to some common livestock disease were found in later years.

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