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Perceived Persuasiveness of Evidence About Adverse Childhood Experiences: Results From a National Survey.

Authors
  • Purtle, Jonathan1
  • Nelson, Katherine L2
  • Srivastav, Aditi3
  • Gollust, Sarah E4
  • 1 Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health (J Purtle and KL Nelson), Philadelphia, Pa. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health (J Purtle and KL Nelson), Philadelphia, Pa.
  • 3 Children's Trust of South Carolina (A Srivastav), Columbia, SC.
  • 4 Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SE Gollust), Minneapolis, Minn.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Academic pediatrics
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
21
Issue
3
Pages
529–533
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2020.05.031
PMID: 32553780
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Advocates must make decisions about the types of evidence they emphasize when communicating to cultivate support for adverse childhood experience (ACE) prevention policies. This study sought to characterize public perceptions of the persuasiveness of 12 ACE evidence statements and assess differences by ideology in the strength of these evidence messages as rationales for ACE prevention policies. A web-based survey of a nationally representative sample of US adults was conducted using the KnowledgePanel (N = 503, completion rate = 60.5%). Respondents read ACE evidence statements and answered questions about the extent to which each was perceived as persuasive. Data were collected and analyzed in 2019. The evidence statements perceived as most persuasive (scoring range 3-17) were those about ACEs as risk factors for mental health and substance use conditions (mean = 12.39) and suicide (mean = 12.14); ACEs generating financial costs for society (mean = 12.03); and the consequences of ACEs being preventable by a supportive adult (mean = 11.97). The evidence statements perceived as least persuasive were about ACEs generating health care costs for individuals (mean = 9.42) and ACEs as risk factors for physical health conditions (mean = 9.47). A larger proportion of liberals than conservatives rated every statement as providing a "strong reason" for ACE prevention policies. These differences were largest for evidence about ACEs generating financial costs for society (84.6% vs 42.8%, P < .0001) and socioeconomic disparities in ACEs (65.1% vs 32.9%, P < .0001). Many ACE evidence statements commonly used in policy advocacy differ from those perceived as most persuasive among a nationally representative sample of US adults. Copyright © 2020 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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