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Perceived cancer-related benefits of quitting smoking and associations with quit intentions among recently diagnosed cancer patients.

Authors
  • Hall, Daniel L1, 2
  • Neil, Jordan M1, 2
  • Ostroff, Jamie S3
  • Hawari, Saif1, 2
  • O'Cleirigh, Conall1, 2
  • Park, Elyse R1, 2
  • 1 Massachusetts General Hospital, USA.
  • 2 Harvard Medical School, USA.
  • 3 Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of health psychology
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
26
Issue
6
Pages
831–842
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1359105319845131
PMID: 31035808
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

One third of smokers diagnosed with cancer continue smoking, perhaps due to low perceived cancer-related benefits of cessation. To examine perceived cancer-related benefits of quitting among newly diagnosed cancer patients who smoke and associations with quit intentions, baseline measures from patients (N = 303) enrolled in a randomized controlled trial were analyzed using hierarchical regression models and bootstrapping. Higher perceived cancer-related benefits of quitting were associated with having a smoking-related cancer and less education. Perceived cancer-related benefits of quitting and quit intentions were positively correlated, particularly among patients with smoking-related cancers. For smokers with smoking-related cancers, perceived cancer-related benefits of quitting are correlated with quit intentions.

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