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Pediatric polysomnography-flagging etiologies and impact on the clinical timeline

Authors
  • Rani, Seema1
  • Schanz, John2
  • Chauhan, Kapil3
  • Kolb, August1
  • Gatta, Victoria1
  • Strang, Abigail1
  • Chidekel, Aaron C.1
  • 1 Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Nemours Children's Health, Wilmington, DE , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD , (United States)
  • 3 Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Sleep
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A.
Publication Date
Jan 18, 2024
Volume
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/frsle.2023.1302509
Source
Frontiers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Sleep
  • Brief Research Report
License
Green

Abstract

Background/objective There is a paucity of literature regarding “flagging” abnormal sleep studies for expedited review. This single-center retrospective analysis (n = 266) of flagged polysomnography studies from 2019 to 2022 aimed to investigate flagging and its impact on the clinical timeline. Methods Two hundred sixty-six flagged polysomnography studies from 2019 to 2022 were retrospectively reviewed. Results Flagged study etiologies included repetitive brief oxygen desaturations (46.6%), sustained desaturations (32.3%), sustained hypercapnia (5.6%), or other concerning events (15.5%). The median time between a flagged study and scoring report finalization, medical intervention, and surgical intervention were 0 (2) days, 2 (3) days, 5 (11.25) days, and 44 (73) days, respectively. Patients with apnea–hypopnea index >30 had less time between a flagged study and surgical intervention (65.3 ± 96.7 days vs. 112 ± 119 days, p = 0.044). Conclusion As anticipated, the time to surgical intervention was longer than to medical intervention. Patients with a higher disease severity experienced quicker scoring, report finalization, and surgical intervention.

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