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Pediatric chest x-ray in covid-19 infection

Authors
  • Oterino Serrano, C1
  • Alonso, E1
  • Andrés, M1
  • Buitrago, NM1
  • Pérez Vigara, A1
  • Parrón Pajares, M1
  • Cuesta López, E2
  • Garzón Moll, G3
  • Martin Espin, I4
  • Bueno Barriocanal, M4
  • De Ceano-Vivas la Calle, M5
  • Calvo Rey, C6
  • Bret-Zurita, M7
  • 1 Pediatric Radiology Section. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Hospital Infantil, Madrid, Spain
  • 2 Cardiothoracic Radiology Section. Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
  • 3 Radiology Department Chief. Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
  • 4 Emergency Department. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Hospital Infantil, Madrid, Spain
  • 5 Emergency Department Chief. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Hospital Infantil, Madrid, Spain
  • 6 Department of Infectious Disease Chief. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Hospital Infantil, Madrid, Spain
  • 7 Pediatric Radiology Section Chief. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Hospital Infantil, Madrid, Spain
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Journal of Radiology
Publisher
Elsevier B.V.
Publication Date
Aug 26, 2020
Volume
131
Pages
109236–109236
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2020.109236
PMID: 32932176
PMCID: PMC7448740
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

BACKGROUND The outbreak of COVID-19 has become pandemic. Pediatric population has been less studied than adult population and prompt diagnosis is challenging due to asymptomatic or mild episodes. Radiology is an important complement to clinical and epidemiological features. OBJECTIVE To establish the most common CXR patterns in children with COVID-19, evaluate interobserver correlation and to discuss the role of imaging techniques in the management of children. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-four patients between 0 and 16 years of age with confirmed SARS-Cov-2 infection and CXR were selected. Two paediatric radiologists independently evaluated the images and assessed the type of abnormality, distribution and evolution when available. RESULTS Median age was 79.8 months (ranging from 2 weeks to 16 years of age). Fever was the most common symptom (43.5 %). 90 % of CXR showed abnormalities. Peribronchial cuffing was the most common finding (86.3 %) followed by GGOs (50 %). In both cases central distribution was more common than peripheral. Consolidations accounted for 18.1 %. Normal CXR, pleural effusion, and altered cardiomediastinal contour were the least common. CONCLUSION The vast majority of CXR showed abnormalities in children with COVID-19. However, findings are nonspecific. Interobserver correlation was good in describing consolidations, normal x-rays and GGOs. Imaging techniques have a role in the management of children with known or suspected COVID-19, especially in those with moderate or severe symptoms or with underlying risk factors.

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