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PC12 neuron-like cell response to electrospun poly( 3-hydroxybutyrate) substrates.

Authors
  • Genchi, Giada Graziana
  • Ciofani, Gianni
  • Polini, Alessandro
  • Liakos, Ioannis
  • Iandolo, Donata
  • Athanassiou, Athanassia
  • Pisignano, Dario
  • Mattoli, Virgilio
  • Menciassi, Arianna
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2015
Volume
9
Issue
2
Pages
151–161
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/term.1623
PMID: 23086861
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In the last decade, the importance of topographic properties of extracellular environments has been shown to be essential to addressing cell response, especially when replacing damaged tissues with functional constructs obtained in vitro. In the current study, densely packed sub-micron poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fibres were electrospun with random and parallel orientations. PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that mimic central dopaminergic neurons and represent a model for neuronal differentiation were cultured on collagen-coated fibres to evaluate cell response dependence on substrate topography. Cell adhesion, viability and proliferation, as well as dopamine production were evaluated after three days since seeding. Cell differentiation was examined in terms of neurite number, orientation and length 6 days after administration of nerve growth factor (NGF). Results showed that proliferating PC12 cells secreted a higher quantity of dopamine on fibres with respect to control cultures and as a result, a possible use of PHB fibres was considered for cell transplantation in the central nervous system when local production of dopamine is impaired. Differentiated PC12 cells were characterized by highly aligned and longer neurites on parallel PHB fibres with respect to random fibres, thereby demonstrating the suitability of parallel PHB fibres for further studies in peripheral nervous system regeneration.

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