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Patient factors affecting 18F FDG uptake in children.

Authors
  • Debnath, Pradipta1
  • Trout, Andrew T2
  • 1 Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Kasota Building MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH 45229, United States of America. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Kasota Building MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH 45229, United States of America; Department of Radiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical imaging
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2024
Volume
107
Pages
110093–110093
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinimag.2024.110093
PMID: 38295511
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To characterize physiologic uptake of 18F FDG in children undergoing PET/CT as a step to informing efforts to optimize FDG PET image quality in children. This retrospective study included 193 clinically indicated 18F FDG PET/CT examinations from 139 patients. 3D spherical regions of interest (ROIs) in the liver and in the thigh muscle (an area of uniform low-level uptake) were used to measure counts and mean standardized uptake value by body weight (SUVmean-bw). Counts, SUVs, and liver signal to noise ratio (SNR) were assessed for associations with patient-specific predictor variables using Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression. Mean patient age was 11.0 ± 5.4 (SD) years, mean liver SUVmean-bw was 1.77 ± 0.60 and mean liver counts was 5387 ± 1875 Bq/mL. On univariable analysis liver SUVmean-bw and liver counts were strongly correlated with weight (r = 0.87, p < 0.0001), age (r = 0.75, p < 0.0001) and total injected activity (r = 0.85, p < 0.0001). Mean thigh counts were significantly associated only with injected activity/kilogram (r = 0.37, p < 0.0001). On multivariable analysis, body weight and age (which is collinear with body weight) were the only significant independent predictors (p < 0.0001). Liver SNR was moderately associated with all predictors apart from injected activity per kilogram (r = 0.09, p = 0.23). Liver counts on 18F FDG PET/CT have a significant positive association with age and body weight. However, liver SNR has no significant association with injected activity per kilogram suggesting that increasing dose per kilogram may not improve image quality in young children. Copyright © 2024 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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