Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Particle-induced oxidative damage by indoor size-segregated particulate matter from coal-burning homes in the Xuanwei lung cancer epidemic area, Yunnan Province, China.

Authors
  • Feng, Xiaolei1
  • Shao, Longyi2
  • Xi, Chunxiu3
  • Jones, Tim4
  • Zhang, Daizhou5
  • BéruBé, Kelly6
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining and College of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing, 100083, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining and College of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing, 100083, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 3 State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining and College of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing, 100083, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 4 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10, 3YE, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 5 Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto, 62-8502, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
  • 6 School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10, 3US, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chemosphere
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
256
Pages
127058–127058
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.127058
PMID: 32450353
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Size-segregated samples of airborne particulate matter were collected at the coal-burning homes of the Hutou high lung cancer epidemic village and a comparison site Xize village of the Xuanwei County, Yuanan Province, by an Anderson Cascade Impact Sampler in winter and spring to study the toxicological characteristics of different-sized particles. The DNA damage caused by the water-soluble fractions of these size-segregated particles was analyzed by the plasmid scission assay, and the trace element compositions were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The DNA damage rate from the airborne particles in the high lung cancer incidence area was higher than that in Xize village. The different-sized particles have highly varying DNA damage rates, with the values being greater in the small size range than in the large size range. The particle-induced DNA damage rates had a significantly positive correlation with total water-soluble trace elements. Further analysis of the individual elements indicated that the water-soluble heavy metals Zn, Cu, Cd, Rb, Cs, and Sb had a positive correlation with the particle-induced DNA damage, implying that these water-soluble heavy metals played an important role in the DNA damage. The Sr had a negative correlation with the particle-induced DNA damage, suggesting that the water-soluble Sr might counter DNA damage. The mass concentrations of the total and individual water-soluble trace elements were mostly enriched in the small particle size ranges, thus implying the indoor airborne particles in the small size ranges would have a higher health risk. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times