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Part I: an introduction to conducting qualitative research in children with cancer.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses
Publication Date
Volume
17
Issue
4
Pages
192–206
Identifiers
PMID: 11063514
Source
Medline

Abstract

Over the past decade, pediatric nurse researchers have acknowledged the need to study children's cancer illness experiences within the qualitative research framework. Support for more qualitative research is based on the belief that it will afford researchers the opportunity to get closer to understanding children's perspectives of their cancer experience. A priori theories or generalizations by the researcher are not imposed; therefore, information emerging from the research is believed to be more a reflection of the perspectives of child participants and not adult researchers. Although pediatric oncology nurses may be interested in using more qualitative methods in their research, deciding on the appropriate qualitative research design may not always be so evident, considering that the adoption of qualitative inquiry in the study of childhood cancer is in its infancy. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to increase the reader's understanding of the use of the qualitative research paradigm in the study of children's experiences with cancer. An overview of four qualitative research designs that pediatric oncology nurse researchers may adopt is presented. Specifically, the qualitative designs of grounded theory, ethnography, phenomenology, and biography or illness narratives are examined. To facilitate discussion, each of the four designs are applied to the study of symptom experiences in children with cancer.

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