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Parenting behavior in families of female adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury in comparison to a clinical and a nonclinical control group

Authors
  • Tschan, Taru1
  • Schmid, Marc2
  • In-Albon, Tina1
  • 1 Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Koblenz-Landau, Ostbahnstrasse 12 76829, Landau, Germany , Landau (Germany)
  • 2 University of Basel, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Basel, Switzerland , Basel (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Jul 08, 2015
Volume
9
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s13034-015-0051-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is often accompanied by dysfunctional familial relationships. Problems within the family are also frequent triggers for NSSI.MethodsThe current study investigated the parenting behavior in families of 45 female adolescents with NSSI disorder, 27 adolescents with other mental disorders (clinical controls, CCs), and 44 adolescents without mental disorders (nonclinical controls, NCs). The adolescents and their parents (92 mothers, 24 fathers) were surveyed using self-report measures. The parenting dimensions warmth and support, psychological control, and behavioral control (demands, rules, and discipline), as well as parental psychopathology and parental satisfaction were assessed.ResultsAdolescents with NSSI disorder reported significantly less maternal warmth and support than NCs (d = .64); this group difference was not evident in mothers’ reports. No group differences emerged regarding adolescent-reported paternal parenting behavior. Mothers of adolescents with NSSI reported higher depression, anxiety, and stress scores than mothers in the NC group and less parental satisfaction than mothers in both control groups (CC and NC).ConclusionsGiven the association between NSSI, low levels of adolescent-reported maternal warmth and support and low levels of mother-reported parental satisfaction, clinical interventions for adolescents with NSSI should focus on improving family communication and interaction.

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