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Parental Attitudes Toward Deep Brain Stimulation in Adolescents with Treatment-Resistant Conditions.

Authors
  • Storch, Eric A1
  • Cepeda, Sandra L1
  • Lee, Eric1
  • Goodman, Sarah L V1
  • Robinson, Anthony D2
  • De Nadai, Alessandro S2
  • Schneider, Sophie C1
  • Sheth, Sameer A3
  • Torgerson, Laura4
  • Lázaro-Muñoz, Gabriel4
  • 1 Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
  • 2 Department of Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
  • 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
  • 4 Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
30
Issue
2
Pages
97–103
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/cap.2019.0134
PMID: 31697591
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: To examine parent's perceptions of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and whether DBS is perceived to be a viable and safe treatment for their adolescent child presenting with a severe, treatment-resistant neurological or psychiatric condition. Method: Two hundred and seventy-nine parents completed an online survey using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). Participants were presented with five vignette scenarios involving adolescents with severe, treatment-resistant neurological or psychiatric conditions: Rett syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. Parents were then asked to evaluate each scenario and rate overall acceptability of using DBS to improve their child's core symptoms. Data were collected over a period of 2 weeks in the month of October 2018. Results: We found that parents reported favorable impressions of DBS regardless of the target condition, especially when greater improvement could be assured and when their child had the capacity to assist in the treatment decision-making. Parents indicated some reluctance to use DBS when possible safety concerns were present. Familiarity with DBS was directly associated with attitudes. Conclusions: The findings highlight an overall parental willingness to consider DBS as a treatment option for key symptoms of neurological and psychiatric conditions in adolescents.

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