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Parasitism underground: lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) from Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) along its coastal distribution in Argentina

Authors
  • Martino, Natalia S.
  • Romero, Mariano D.
  • Malizia, Ana I.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta Parasitologica
Publisher
De Gruyter Open
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2014
Volume
60
Issue
1
Pages
154–157
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/ap-2015-0021
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Species of South American subterranean rodents belonging to the genus Ctenomys (commonly called tuco-tucos) are widely distributed across the southern Neotropical region. Despite their relatively well-studied biology and reproductive physiology, current knowledge of their ectoparasite fauna is limited to a few ambiguous studies, based on scattered samples from a small number of host individuals. Ctenomys talarum is the most widely distributed species in the genus. Lice (Phthiraptera) were collected from these tuco-tucos throughout their entire coastal range. Two species, one chewing louse (Gyropus parvus), and one sucking louse (Eulinognathus americanus) were collected. The distribution ranges for both louse species were extended with new locality records. No lice were found in two host populations. Furthermore, co-occurrence of both ectoparasites was not detected.

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