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Parainfluenza viral infections in pediatric outpatients: seasonal patterns and clinical characteristics.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Pediatric infectious disease journal
Publication Date
Volume
13
Issue
4
Pages
269–273
Identifiers
PMID: 8036042
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Parainfluenza types 1, 2 and 3 were studied in a pediatric outpatient population from 1976 to 1992 to compare seasonal patterns over time and to define better the spectrum of illness in all ages of children caused by these viruses. Parainfluenza type 1 occurred in the fall of odd numbered years; parainfluenza type 2 was less predictable; and parainfluenza type 3 appeared yearly with peak activity in spring or summer. The parainfluenza viruses were the major cause of croup and also accounted for one-half of the cases of laryngitis and over one-third of all lower respiratory tract illness in children from whom a virus was isolated. The major clinical manifestations of infection with parainfluenza types 1 and 2 were croup, upper respiratory infections and pharyngitis; for parainfluenza type 3 upper respiratory tract infection was predominant in all age groups. The parainfluenza viruses cause appreciable respiratory morbidity each year among infants and young children. They are the major cause of croup but also produce a spectrum of diseases ranging from mild upper respiratory tract infection to bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Most studies have focused on the morbidity of parainfluenza viruses in infants and young children who are hospitalized. Less appreciated is the impact of parainfluenza viral infections in outpatients and in older children. The parainfluenza viruses have a striking epidemiologic pattern which has evolved over the past 30 years. In the early 1960s parainfluenza types 1, 2 and 3 were all reported to be endemic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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