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Pain resilience, pain catastrophizing, and executive functioning: performance on a short-term memory task during simultaneous ischemic pain.

Authors
  • Ysidron, Dominic W1
  • France, Janis L1
  • Himawan, Lina K1
  • France, Christopher R2
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Ohio University, 251 Porter Hall, Athens, OH, 45701, USA.
  • 2 Department of Psychology, Ohio University, 251 Porter Hall, Athens, OH, 45701, USA. [email protected] , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
1
Pages
104–110
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-020-00181-y
PMID: 32935284
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Among pain researchers there is a growing interest in the relationship between psychological resilience and pain experience. Whereas much of this work has focused on individual differences in pain perception or sensitivity, an equally important dimension of resilience is the capacity to persist with goal-directed activity despite experiencing pain. Consistent with this latter focus, the current study examined how pain resilience and pain catastrophizing combine to moderate the effects of ischemic pain on short-term memory task performance. Using a within-subjects design, 121 healthy participants completed four trials of a Corsi block-tapping task with pain exposure during the second and fourth trials. Results indicated that a combination of high pain resilience and low pain catastrophizing was associated with better task performance during the second pain exposure. These findings confirm existing evidence that resilience can moderate performance during pain, and offer new evidence that resilience and catastrophizing interact to shape this effect.

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