Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Ozone pollution in the west China rain zone and its adjacent regions, Southwestern China: Concentrations, ecological risk, and Sources.

Authors
  • Cao, Yuanfei1
  • Qiao, Xue2
  • Hopke, Philip K3
  • Ying, Qi4
  • Zhang, Yueying1
  • Zeng, Yingying5
  • Yuan, Yanping1
  • Tang, Ya6
  • 1 Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology & Healthy Food Evaluation Research Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China. , (China)
  • 2 Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology & Healthy Food Evaluation Research Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China; State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China. , (China)
  • 3 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, United States; Center for Air Resources Engineering and Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, 13699, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, United States. , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Environment, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China. , (China)
  • 6 State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China; Department of Environment, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chemosphere
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
256
Pages
127008–127008
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.127008
PMID: 32438126
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Located in the transitional region between the Sichuan Basin (SCB) and Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), the West China Rain Zone (WCRZ) is a large-scale ecotone and partially belongs to the Southwest China Mountains, which is one of the world's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Using observation data from national air quality stations and our own monitoring data, we investigated the risk from O3 to vegetation and the major source-region of O3 for two UNESCO (i.e., United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) world heritage properties (Mt. Qingcheng and Mt. Emei) and one city (Ya'an) in the WCRZ. The results show that the annual mean maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) O3 concentration in Mt. Qingcheng (54 ppb) was higher than that in the adjacent SCB cities (38-48 ppb). The acute and chronic risk levels from O3 to vegetation were also higher in Mt. Qingcheng than at all the other sites. The mean MDA8 O3 concentrations and the O3 risk levels to vegetation in Mt. Emei and Ya'an fell in the range of that at the SCB and QTP cities. However, O3 exposures at all the WCRZ, SCB, and QTP sites exceeded the empirical critical loads for natural ecosystems, forest trees, and highly O3-sensitive plants. The SCB was identified as the largest source-region of O3 for Mt. Qingcheng and Mt. Emei but other Chinese regions and northern India also had considerable contributions. To protect biodiversity and ecosystem services, there is a need to further systematically study O3 and its ecological impacts for the entire WCRZ. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times