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Ozone pollution, oxidative stress, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration.

Authors
  • Bello-Medina, P C1
  • Rodríguez-Martínez, E1
  • Prado-Alcalá, R A2
  • Rivas-Arancibia, S3
  • 1 Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 2 Departamento de Neurobiología Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Querétaro, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 3 Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, Mexico. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurologia (Barcelona, Spain)
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
37
Issue
4
Pages
277–286
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.nrleng.2018.10.025
PMID: 34531154
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Overpopulation and industrial growth result in an increase in air pollution, mainly due to suspended particulate matter and the formation of ozone. Repeated exposure to low doses of ozone, such as on a day with high air pollution levels, results in a state of chronic oxidative stress, causing the loss of dendritic spines, alterations in cerebral plasticity and in learning and memory mechanisms, and neuronal death and a loss of brain repair capacity. This has a direct impact on human health, increasing the incidence of chronic and degenerative diseases. We performed a search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases for original articles and reviews published between 2000 and 2018 and addressing the main consequences of ozone exposure on synaptic plasticity, information processing in cognitive processes, and the alterations that may lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. This review describes one of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the effect of repeated exposure to low doses of ozone, which causes loss of synaptic plasticity by producing a state of chronic oxidative stress. This brain function is key to both information processing and the generation of structural changes in neuronal populations. We also address the effect of chronic ozone exposure on brain tissue and the close relationship between ozone pollution and the appearance and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2019 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

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