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An overview of heart failure in low- and middle-income countries.

Authors
  • Agbor, Valirie N1, 2
  • Ntusi, Ntobeko A B3, 4, 5
  • Noubiap, Jean Jacques3, 6
  • 1 Ibal Sub-Divisional Hospital, Oku, Northwest Region, Cameroon. , (Cameroon)
  • 2 Department of Clinical Research, Health Education and Research Organization (HERO), Buea, Cameroon. , (Cameroon)
  • 3 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 4 Cape Universities Body Imaging Center, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 5 Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 6 Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide and Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cardiovascular diagnosis and therapy
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
2
Pages
244–251
Identifiers
DOI: 10.21037/cdt.2019.08.03
PMID: 32420107
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) is a global public health concern with disproportionate socioeconomic, morbidity and mortality burden on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This review summarises contemporary data on the demographic and clinical characteristics, aetiologies, treatment, economic burden and outcomes of HF in LMICs. Patients with HF in LMICs are younger than those from high-income countries (HICs) and present at advanced stages of the disease. Hypertension, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cardiomyopathy (CMO), and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the leading causes of HF in LMICs. The contribution of infectious diseases to HF remains prominent in many LMICs. Most health facilities in LMICs lack adequate diagnostic tools for HF, and the use of evidence-based medical and device therapies is suboptimal. Further, HF in LMICs is associated with prolonged hospital stay and high in-hospital and one-year mortality. Finally, HF has profound economic impact on individual patients who, mostly, have no health insurance, and on societies where patients are young, comprising those who have the greatest potential to contribute to economic productivity. 2020 Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Therapy. All rights reserved.

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