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Outcomes of hip arthroplasty in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

Authors
  • Zhang, Yu1
  • Chu, Shan-Shan2
  • Liu, Kai1
  • Huang, Qiu1
  • Wang, Yongcai3
  • 1 Department of Orthopedics, the People's Hospital of Leshan, Baita Street 238#, Leshan, 614000, Sichuan province, China. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Neurology, the People's Hospital of Leshan, Baita Street 238#, Leshan, 614000, Sichuan province, China. , (China)
  • 3 Department of Orthopedics, the People's Hospital of Leshan, Baita Street 238#, Leshan, 614000, Sichuan province, China. [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Orthopaedics
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
46
Issue
4
Pages
705–716
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00264-021-05228-6
PMID: 34713326
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Hip arthroplasty in Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered to be associated with higher mortality, perioperative complications, and worse clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of hip arthroplasty in PD. The PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for all available studies comparing the outcomes of hip arthroplasty in PD and non-PD patients. The quality of the studies was scored using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS). Meta-analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Six retrospective cohort studies with a total of 59,878 patients were included. Among them, there were 15,313 patients in the Parkinson's group and 44,565 in the non-Parkinson's group. Results showed that patients in the Parkinson's group were more likely to have periprosthetic fracture (OR = 7.93, 95% CI, 1.96-32.04; P = 0.004), revision surgery (OR = 2.33, 95% CI, 1.37-3.98; P = 0.002), deep vein thrombosis (OR = 2.34, 95% CI, 1.56-3.49; P < 0.01), and urinary tract infection (OR = 1.34, 95% CI, 1.20-1.49; P < 0.01) than those in the non-Parkinson's group. The Parkinson's group had a longer hospital stay (WMD = 0.38, 95% CI, 0.24-0.52; P < 0.01) and higher hospitalization costs (WMD = 2487.08, 95% CI, 225.99-4748.17; P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference in short-term postoperative mortality (OR = 1.07, 95% CI, 0.65-1.73; P = 0.80). Hip arthroplasty can significantly improve the function of patients with PD and reduce pain. Although hip arthroplasty in patients with PD is associated with a higher revision rate and potential risk, it does not increase short-term mortality and can reduce pain, improve function, and improve quality of life. The periprosthetic fracture risk and revision rate are significantly higher and should be accounted for when deciding on operative treatment and communicated to patient with PD. © 2021. The Author(s) under exclusive licence to SICOT aisbl.

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