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Other Zooplankton

Authors
  • Rudstam, L.G.
Type
Book
Journal
Encyclopedia of Inland Waters
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2009
Pages
667–677
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/B978-012370626-3.00148-4
ISBN: 978-0-12-370626-3
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Zooplankton consist of many species other than copepods and cladocerans. Some are predators and structure zooplankton communities. They spend the day in dark (mysids, amphipods, water mites), or deoxygenated water (phantom midge larva, Chaoboridae) to avoid visually feeding fish. During the night they migrate into the water column to feed. Mysids are found in both deep cold lakes and shallow lakes and rivers. Chaoborids are found worldwide from Arctic tundra ponds to African great lakes. Mysids actively search for their prey but can also filter-feed on algae and consume detritus. Chaoborus larvae are sit-and-wait predators but early instars also feed on algae. Some mysids and chaoborids reach sizes of 25–30 mm and can have generation times of 2 years and longer. Similarly, amphipods (e.g., Lakes Baikal and Biwa), decapod shrimps (e.g., Caridina in the African great lakes), water mites, freshwater jellyfish, and fairy shrimps can be the major components of the zooplankton. Dreissenid mussel larvae or veligers are small (0.07–0.2 mm) and they stay in the water column from 10 to 30 days feeding by filtering smaller particles and by direct uptake of dissolved organic carbon molecules. They can be very abundant during part of the year.

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