Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Original use of a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer for the standardization of liquid fuels spray flames.

Authors
  • Lemaire, R
  • Maugendre, M
  • Schuller, T
  • Therssen, E
  • Yon, J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Review of Scientific Instruments
Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Publication Date
September 2009
Volume
80
Issue
10
Pages
105105–105105
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1063/1.3249561
PMID: 19895089
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is of practical importance to lead laboratory-scale experiments allowing a better understanding of the impact of commercial fuels composition on the formation of combustion residues such as soot particles. To this end, a hybrid burner has been designed recently to burn high-speed sprays of small liquid fuel droplets. It consists of a Holthuis (previously McKenna) burner originally equipped with a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer for the atomization of liquid hydrocarbons. A detailed description of this original setup is given in this paper. A priori estimations of atomization and evaporation times and length scales are then proposed and compared with experimental data. Droplet-size distribution measurements obtained in nonreacting conditions using a Malvern Spraytec particle sizer are presented and compared with values estimated by calculation. Cold sprays contours and liquid jet lengths in flames determined by Mie scattering at 532 and 1064 nm, respectively, are also presented. The results discussed in this work indicate that the hydrodynamic characteristics of the sprays generated with our system are relatively independent of the physical properties of fuels leading to comparable flames with identical liquid jet lengths, dimensions, and global structure. This feature facilitates an accurate comparison of flames burning various liquid hydrocarbons, which is of interest to emphasize differences in pollutants emissions and to highlight chemical effects for soot formation analysis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times