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Organizational Climate Effects on the Relationship Between Emotional Labor and Turnover Intention in Korean Firefighters

Authors
  • Ryu, Hye-Yoon1, 2
  • Hyun, Dae-Sung1, 3
  • Jeung, Da-Yee4
  • Kim, Chang-Soo5
  • Chang, Sei-Jin1, 2
  • 1 Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea
  • 2 Institute of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Republic of Korea
  • 3 Department of Biostatistics and Computing, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • 4 Department of Dental Hygiene, Hanyang Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • 5 Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Type
Published Article
Journal
Safety and Health at Work
Publisher
Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute
Publication Date
Aug 30, 2020
Volume
11
Issue
4
Pages
479–484
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.shaw.2020.08.007
PMID: 33329914
PMCID: PMC7728701
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Original Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background The purpose of this study is to examine the combined effects of organizational climate (OC) with emotional labor (EL) on turnover intention in Korean firefighters. Methods The data were obtained from the study Firefighters Research: Enhancement of Safety and Health. A total of 4,860 firefighters whose main duty was providing “emergency medical aid” were included. To examine the effects of OC on the relationships between five subscales of EL and turnover intention, four groups were created using various combinations of OC (“good” vs. “bad”) and EL (“normal” vs. “risk”): (1) “good” and “normal” (Group I), (2) “bad” and “normal” (Group II), (3) “good” and “risk” (Group III), and (4) “bad” and “risk” (Group IV). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the risk of turnover intention for the combinations of OC and EL. Results The results showed turnover intention was significantly higher in the group with “bad” OC (17.7%) than in that with “good” OC (7.6%). Combined effects of OC and EL on turnover intention were found in all five subscales with the exception of Group I for emotional demands and regulation. Groups II, III, and IV were more likely to experience risks of turnover intention than Group I ( p for trend <0.001). Conclusions A positive and cooperative OC plays a role in decreasing the risk of turnover intention and in attenuating the negative effects of EL on turnover intention in firefighters.

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