Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Oral environment and taste function of Japanese HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy.

Authors
  • Shintani, T1
  • Fujii, T2, 3
  • Yamasaki, N2, 3
  • Kitagawa, M1
  • Iwata, T4
  • Saito, S2, 3
  • Okada, M5
  • Ogawa, I1
  • Unei, H6
  • Hamamoto, K3
  • Nakaoka, M5
  • Kurihara, H1, 4
  • Shiba, H7
  • 1 Center of Oral Clinical Examination, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Division of Blood Transfusion, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 AIDS Care Unit, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Department of Periodontal Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 5 Division of Dental Hygiene, Department of Clinical Practice and Support, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 6 Department of Pharmaceutical Services, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 7 Department of Biological Endodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
7
Pages
829–834
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2019.1656327
PMID: 31426660
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the oral environment and the taste function of Japanese HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy. Their median age of 73 patients taking anti-HIV drugs was 46 years. The median period of taking anti-HIV drugs was 30 months. The oral condition was evaluated by measurement of oral moisture, amount of saliva secretion, the number of oral bacteria, presence of oral candida, a taste test, and the number of missing teeth. The levels of oral moisture and secreted saliva were significantly lower in the HIV-infected group than in the healthy volunteer (control) group. The HIV-infected group showed a more robust decrease in taste sensation than the control group. The number of missing teeth was significantly higher in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. Furthermore, all of the evaluated oral conditions were worse in the HIV-infected patients whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts were less than 500/mm3 than in the control group. It became clear that the patients taking anti-HIV drugs, especially the CD4+ count < 500/mm3 group, had a deteriorated oral environment and dysgeusia, suggesting that the management of oral hygiene is necessary to maintain oral health, which leads to systemic health.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times