Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Oral Disorders in Sjögren’s Syndrome

Authors
  • Gobeljic, Mirjana Sijan
  • Milic, Vera
  • Pejnovic, Nada
  • Damjanov, Nemanja
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental and Applied Biomedical Research (EABR)
Publisher
Sciendo
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2023
Volume
24
Issue
3
Pages
181–192
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2478/sjecr-2018-0023
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a complex, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease that mainly affects the exocrine glands, especially the salivary and lacrimal glands, leading to the dryness of the mouth and eyes, along with fatigue, joint and muscle pain. The prevalence of SS is estimated to be between 0.05% and 1% in European population. Diagnosis of SS is based on the revised criteria of the American-European consensus group (AECG). Sjögren’s syndrome can be subclassified into primary disease (primary Sjögren syndrome, pSS) and a secondary disease (secondary Sjögren syndrome, sSS) when present with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis. The decrease in salivary flow and qualitative alterations in saliva could explain many of the oral manifestations frequently present in patients with SS. Low salivary flow may affect chewing, swallowing, speech and sleeping in pSS patients. Oral manifestations include dental erosion, dental caries, mucosal infection, ulcers and oral candidiasis. Recent studies reveal that pSS patients experience impaired olfactory and gustatory functions and have higher occurrence of oral complications such as dysgeusia, burning sensation in the tongue (BST) and halitosis. The exocrine manifestations and systemic involvement in SS significantly impact the patient’s perception of oral healthrelated quality of life (OHRQoL).

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times