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Optimal transport- and kernel-based early detection of mild cognitive impairment patients based on magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography images

Authors
  • Liu, Ziyu1
  • Johnson, Travis S.2
  • Shao, Wei2
  • Zhang, Min1
  • Zhang, Jie2
  • Huang, Kun2, 3
  • 1 Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA , West Lafayette (United States)
  • 2 Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, USA , Indianapolis (United States)
  • 3 Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, USA , Indianapolis (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Jan 07, 2022
Volume
14
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s13195-021-00915-3
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundTo help clinicians provide timely treatment and delay disease progression, it is crucial to identify dementia patients during the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage and stratify these MCI patients into early and late MCI stages before they progress to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the process of diagnosing MCI and AD in living patients, brain scans are collected using neuroimaging technologies such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or positron emission tomography (PET). These brain scans measure the volume and molecular activity within the brain resulting in a very promising avenue to diagnose patients early in a minimally invasive manner.MethodsWe have developed an optimal transport based transfer learning model to discriminate between early and late MCI. Combing this transfer learning model with bootstrap aggregation strategy, we overcome the overfitting problem and improve model stability and prediction accuracy.ResultsWith the transfer learning methods that we have developed, we outperform the current state of the art MCI stage classification frameworks and show that it is crucial to leverage Alzheimer’s disease and normal control subjects to accurately predict early and late stage cognitive impairment.ConclusionsOur method is the current state of the art based on benchmark comparisons. This method is a necessary technological stepping stone to widespread clinical usage of MRI-based early detection of AD.

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