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An optimal sampling approach to modelling whole-body vibration exposure in all-terrain vehicle driving.

Authors
  • Lü, Xiaoshu1, 2, 3
  • Takala, Esa-Pekka4
  • Toppila, Esko4
  • Marjanen, Ykä5
  • Kaila-Kangas, Leena4
  • Lu, Tao1
  • 1 a Department of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering , Aalto University , Espoo , Finland. , (Finland)
  • 2 d College of Construction Engineering , Jilin University , Changchun , P.R. China. , (China)
  • 3 e Key Laboratory of Drilling Technology in Complex Conditions of Ministry of Land and Resources of the People's Republic of China , Changchun , P.R. China. , (China)
  • 4 b Finnish Institute of Occupational Health , Helsinki , Finland. , (Finland)
  • 5 c Xardu Oy , Oulu , Finland. , (Finland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ergonomics
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2017
Volume
60
Issue
8
Pages
1074–1084
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2016.1250957
PMID: 27778757
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) presents an occupational health risk and several safety standards obligate to measure WBV. The high cost of direct measurements in large epidemiological studies raises the question of the optimal sampling for estimating WBV exposures given by a large variation in exposure levels in real worksites. This paper presents a new approach to addressing this problem. A daily exposure to WBV was recorded for 9-24 days among 48 all-terrain vehicle drivers. Four data-sets based on root mean squared recordings were obtained from the measurement. The data were modelled using semi-variogram with spectrum analysis and the optimal sampling scheme was derived. The optimum sampling period was 140 min apart. The result was verified and validated in terms of its accuracy and statistical power. Recordings of two to three hours are probably needed to get a sufficiently unbiased daily WBV exposure estimate in real worksites. The developed model is general enough that is applicable to other cumulative exposures or biosignals. Practitioner Summary: Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) presents an occupational health risk and safety standards obligate to measure WBV. However, direct measurements can be expensive. This paper presents a new approach to addressing this problem. The developed model is general enough that is applicable to other cumulative exposures or biosignals.

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