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Opposing Pressures of Speed and Efficiency Guide the Evolution of Molecular Machines

Authors
  • Wagoner, Jason A1
  • Dill, Ken A1, 2, 3
  • 1 Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY
  • 2 Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY
  • 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Aug 20, 2019
Volume
36
Issue
12
Pages
2813–2822
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msz190
PMID: 31432071
PMCID: PMC6878954
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many biomolecular machines need to be both fast and efficient. How has evolution optimized these machines along the tradeoff between speed and efficiency? We explore this question using optimizable dynamical models along coordinates that are plausible evolutionary degrees of freedom. Data on 11 motors and ion pumps are consistent with the hypothesis that evolution seeks an optimal balance of speed and efficiency, where any further small increase in one of these quantities would come at great expense to the other. For FoF1-ATPases in different species, we also find apparent optimization of the number of subunits in the c-ring, which determines the number of protons pumped per ATP synthesized. Interestingly, these ATPases appear to more optimized for efficiency than for speed, which can be rationalized through their key role as energy transducers in biology. The present modeling shows how the dynamical performance properties of biomolecular motors and pumps may have evolved to suit their corresponding biological actions.

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