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Only a small fraction of cells produce assembled capsids during transfection-based manufacturing of adeno-associated virus vectors.

Authors
  • Dash, Shantoshini1
  • Sharon, David M1
  • Mullick, Alaka2
  • Kamen, Amine A1, 2
  • 1 Department of Bioengineering, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, Québec, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2022
Volume
119
Issue
6
Pages
1685–1690
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/bit.28068
PMID: 35182435
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Plasmid transfection of mammalian cells is the dominant platform used to produce adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for clinical and research applications. Low yields from this platform currently make it difficult to supply these activities with adequate material. In an effort to better understand the current limitations of transfection-based manufacturing, this study examines what proportion of cells in a model transfection produce appreciable amounts of assembled AAV capsid. Using conformation-specific antibody staining and flow cytometry, we report the surprising result that despite obtaining high transfection efficiencies and nominal vector yields in our model system, only 5%-10% of cells appear to produce measurable levels of assembled AAV capsids. This finding implies that considerable increases in vector titer could be realized through increasing the proportion of productive cells. Furthermore, we suggest that the flow cytometry assay used here to quantify productive cells may be a useful metric for future optimization of transfection-based AAV vector manufacturing platforms. © 2022 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.

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