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Oligonucleotide inhibitors of human thrombin that bind distinct epitopes.

Authors
  • Tasset, D M
  • Kubik, M F
  • Steiner, W
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of molecular biology
Publication Date
Oct 10, 1997
Volume
272
Issue
5
Pages
688–698
Identifiers
PMID: 9368651
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Thrombin, a multifunctional serine protease, recognizes multiple macromolecular substrates and plays a key role in both procoagulant and anticoagulant functions. The substrate specificity of thrombin involves two electropositive surfaces, the fibrinogen-recognition and heparin-binding exosites. The SELEX process is a powerful combinatorial methodology for identifying high-affinity oligonucleotide ligands to any desired target. The SELEX process has been used to isolate single-stranded DNA ligands to human thrombin. Here, a 29-nucleotide single-stranded DNA ligand to human thrombin, designated 60-18[29], with a Kd of approximately 0.5 nM is described. DNA 60-18[29] inhibits thrombin-catalyzed fibrin clot formation in vitro. Previously described DNA ligands bind the fibrinogen-recognition exosite, while competition and photocrosslinking experiments indicate that the DNA ligand 60-18[29] binds the heparin-binding exosite. DNA 60-18[29] is a quadruplex/duplex with a 15-nucleotide "core" sequence that has striking similarity to previously described DNA ligands to thrombin, but binds with 20 to 50-fold higher affinity. The 15-nucleotide core sequence has eight highly conserved guanine residues and forms a G-quadruplex structure. A single nucleotide within the G-quadruplex structure can direct the DNA to a distinct epitope. Additional sequence information in the duplex regions of ligand 60-18[29] contribute to greater stability and affinity of binding to thrombin. A low-resolution model for the interaction of DNA 60-18[29] to human thrombin has been proposed.

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