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Ochratoxin A as a potential etiologic factor in endemic nephropathy: lessons from toxicity studies in rats.

Authors
  • Mally, A
  • Hard, G C
  • Dekant, W
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food and Chemical Toxicology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2007
Volume
45
Issue
11
Pages
2254–2260
Identifiers
PMID: 17629386
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Various reports suggest that chronic dietary exposure to ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin frequently detected in various food items may be linked to the pathogenesis of endemic nephropathy, a chronic tubulointerstitial kidney disease which occurs in geographically limited areas of the Balkan region. OTA is a potent nephrotoxin and renal carcinogen. However, the pathological lesions observed in kidneys of rats treated with OTA appear be rather different from the clinical and pathological characteristics of endemic nephropathy. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that OTA does not bind to DNA but induces tumors by an epigenetic, thresholded mechanism. This implies that there is a dose below which no adverse health effects are expected to occur. Based on food consumption data and OTA serum concentrations, it appears that human exposure - even in areas with relatively high dietary exposure to OTA such as endemic villages - is several orders of magnitude below doses known to cause nephrotoxicity and tumor formation in laboratory animals. While it is undoubtedly important to encourage prevention of food contamination by OTA and other mycotoxins, these observations suggest that OTA is not likely to be an etiological factor involved in BEN and indicate a need to search for new clues for the etiology of this endemic kidney disease.

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