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The occurrence of fungi in hospital and community potable waters.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Letters in applied microbiology
Publication Date
Volume
29
Issue
2
Pages
81–84
Identifiers
PMID: 10499294
Source
Medline

Abstract

The prevalence of fungi was investigated in 126 potable water samples (84 hospital and 42 community samples), in parallel with the standard pollution indicator micro-organisms. Filamentous fungi were isolated from 104 of 126 (82.5%) samples and yeasts from 14 (11.1%), whereas their mean counts were 36.6 and 4.4, respectively. Fungi were isolated from 95.2% of community and 76.2% of hospital water samples, with the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.05), while yeasts were isolated from 9.5 and 11.9%, respectively. Prevailing genera were Penicillium spp., isolated from 64, Aspergillus spp., from 53, and Candida, from nine of the examined samples. Colony-forming units of yeasts were significantly correlated with those of total and faecal coliforms, whereas the counts of filamentous fungi were significantly correlated with total heterotrophic bacteria counts. These results suggest that tap water is a potential transmission route for fungi both in hospitals and the community in the examined region and may pose a health hazard mainly for the immunocompromised host.

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