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Occupational airborne contamination in south Brazil: 1. Oxidative stress detected in the blood of coal miners

Authors
  • AVILA JUNIOR, S.
  • POSSAMAI, F. P.
  • BUDNI, P.
  • BACKES, P.
  • PARISOTTO, E. B.
  • RIZELIO, V. M.
  • TORRES, M. A.
  • COLEPICOLO, P.
  • WILHELM FILHO, D.
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2009
Source
Biblioteca Digital da Produção Intelectual da Universidade de São Paulo (BDPI/USP)
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown
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Abstract

Reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of coal dust-induced toxicity. The present study investigated several oxidative stress biomarkers (Contents of lipoperoxidation = TBARS, reduced = GSH, oxidized = GSSG and total glutathione = TG, alpha-tocopherol, and the activities of glutathione S-transferase = GST, glutathione reductase = GR, glutathione peroxidase = GPx, catalase = CAT and superoxide dismutase = SOD), in the blood of three different groups (n = 20 each) exposed to airborne contamination associated with coal mining activities: underground workers directly exposed, surface workers indirectly exposed, residents indirectly exposed (subjects living near the mines), and controls (non-exposed subjects). Plasma TBARS were increased and whole blood TG and GSH levels were decreased in all groups compared to controls. Plasma alpha-tocopherol contents showed approximately half the values in underground workers compared to controls. GST activity was induced in workers and also in residents at the vicinity of the mining plant, whilst CAT activity was induced only in mine workers. SOD activity was decreased in all groups examined, while GPx activity showed decreased values only in underground miners, and GR did not show any differences among the groups. The results showed that subjects directly and indirectly exposed to coal dusts face an oxidative stress condition. They also indicate that people living in the vicinity of the mine plant are in health risk regarding coal mining-related diseases.

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