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Nucleotide exchange and cGMP phosphodiesterase activation by pertussis toxin inactivated transducin.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochemistry
0006-2960
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Volume
30
Issue
50
Pages
11637–11645
Identifiers
PMID: 1661143
Source
Medline

Abstract

Transducin, the signal coupling protein of retinal rod photoreceptor cells, is one of a family of G proteins that can be inactivated by pertussis toxin. We have investigated the nature of this inactivation in order to determine (1) whether it requires the toxin-catalyzed transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD+ to cysteine-347 of the alpha subunit and (2) whether it involves locking the alpha subunit in the inactive conformation characteristic of its GDP-bound state, or is limited to disruption of binding to photoexcited rhodopsin (R*). Our results indicate that all observed effects of pertussis toxin treatment, including a shift in the electrophoretic mobility of transducin's alpha subunit and functional inactivation, require NAD+ and that the appearance of the shift parallels incorporation of ADP-ribose. We have also found that, apart from interactions with photoexcited rhodopsin, the functional properties of ADP-ribosylated transducin are essentially the same as those of unmodified transducin. Normal spontaneous nucleotide exchange kinetics and the ability to activate cGMP phosphodiesterase are preserved following quantitative ADP-ribosylation, as are the abilities to hydrolyze GTP, to bind to a dye affinity column, and to display enhanced fluorescence upon addition of Al3+ and F-. Thus, ADP-ribosylation merely blocks catalysis of transducin nucleotide exchange by R* and does not lock transducin in an inactive state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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