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A novel system to quantify intestinal lipid digestion and transport.

Authors
  • Sæle, Øystein1
  • Rød, Kari Elin L2
  • Quinlivan, Vanessa H3
  • Li, Shengrong4
  • Farber, Steven A5
  • 1 Institute of Marine Research, Strandgaten 229, 5004 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Norway)
  • 2 Institute of Marine Research, Strandgaten 229, 5004 Bergen, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 3 Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA; The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
  • 4 Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc., 700 Industrial Park Drive, Alabaster, AL 35007-9105, USA.
  • 5 Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA; The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
May 18, 2018
Volume
1863
Issue
9
Pages
948–957
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbalip.2018.05.006
PMID: 29778665
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The zebrafish larva is a powerful tool for the study of dietary triglyceride (TG) digestion and how fatty acids (FA) derived from dietary lipids are absorbed, metabolized and distributed to the body. While fluorescent FA analogues have enabled visualization of FA metabolism, methods for specifically assaying TG digestion are badly needed. Here we present a novel High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method that quantitatively differentiates TG and phospholipid (PL) molecules with one or two fluorescent FA analogues. We show how this tool may be used to discriminate between undigested and digested TG or phosphatidylcholine (PC), and also the products of TG or PC that have been digested, absorbed and re-synthesized into new lipid molecules. Using this approach, we explored the dietary requirement of zebrafish larvae for phospholipids. Here we demonstrate that dietary TG is digested and absorbed in the intestinal epithelium, but without dietary PC, TG accumulates and is not transported out of the enterocytes. Consequently, intestinal ER stress increases and the ingested lipid is not available support the energy and metabolic needs of other tissues. In TG diets with PC, TG is readily transported from the intestine and subsequently metabolized.

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