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Novel disease resistance gene paralogs created by CRISPR/Cas9 in soy

Authors
  • Nagy, Ervin D.
  • Stevens, Julia L.
  • Yu, Neil
  • Hubmeier, Chris S.
  • LaFaver, Nona
  • Gillespie, Megan
  • Gardunia, Brian
  • Cheng, Qianshun
  • Johnson, Steven
  • Vaughn, Audrey L.
  • Vega-Sanchez, Miguel E.
  • Deng, Mingqui
  • Rymarquis, Linda
  • Lawrence, Richard J.
  • Garvey, Graeme S.
  • Gaeta, Robert T.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Plant Cell Reports
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Mar 11, 2021
Volume
40
Issue
6
Pages
1047–1058
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00299-021-02678-5
PMID: 33704523
PMCID: PMC8184530
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Original Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Key message Novel disease resistance gene paralogues are generated by targeted chromosome cleavage of tandem duplicated NBS-LRR gene complexes and subsequent DNA repair in soybean. This study demonstrates accelerated diversification of innate immunity of plants using CRISPR. Abstract Nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat (NBS-LRR) gene families are key components of effector-triggered immunity. They are often arranged in tandem duplicated arrays in the genome, a configuration that is conducive to recombinations that will lead to new, chimeric genes. These rearrangements have been recognized as major sources of novel disease resistance phenotypes. Targeted chromosome cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9 can conceivably induce rearrangements and thus emergence of new resistance gene paralogues. Two NBS-LRR families of soy have been selected to demonstrate this concept: a four-copy family in the Rpp1 region (Rpp1L) and a large, complex locus, Rps1 with 22 copies. Copy-number variations suggesting large-scale, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated chromosome rearrangements in the Rpp1L and Rps1 complexes were detected in up to 58.8% of progenies of primary transformants using droplet-digital PCR. Sequencing confirmed development of novel, chimeric paralogs with intact open reading frames. These novel paralogs may confer new disease resistance specificities. This method to diversify innate immunity of plants by genome editing is readily applicable to other disease resistance genes or other repetitive loci. Supplementary Information The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s00299-021-02678-5.

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