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Nothing to sneeze at - uptake of protective measures against an influenza pandemic by people with schizophrenia: willingness and perceived barriers.

Authors
  • Maguire, Paul A1
  • Reay, Rebecca E2
  • Looi, Jeffrey Cl3
  • 1 Lecturer and Acting Co-Deputy Head, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Senior Research Coordinator and Lecturer, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Associate Professor and Acting Head, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Garran, ACT, and; Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, and; Director, Research Centre for the Neurosciences of Ageing, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Australasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2019
Volume
27
Issue
2
Pages
171–178
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1039856218815748
PMID: 30501496
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To examine willingness to adopt protective behaviours, and perceived barriers, during a pandemic influenza, in people with schizophrenia. A cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted exploring the responses of 71 adults with schizophrenia and 238 adults without schizophrenia attending a general practice setting, regarding willingness and perceived barriers to adopting protective measures against the 2009 swine influenza pandemic in Australia. The majority of participants with schizophrenia reported that they would be at least moderately willing to be vaccinated (74.2%), isolate themselves (73.2%), wear a face mask (54.9%) and increase hand washing (88.6%). However, 71.8% were concerned about "catching" flu from vaccination. Predictors of willingness to adopt protective actions included self-efficacy (vaccination, face mask, isolation), perceived likelihood of contracting swine flu (vaccination), educational status (face mask) and perceived overall risk from swine flu (face mask). Key modifiable perceived barriers to adopting protective measures were identified, including cost and need for transport assistance for vaccination. People with schizophrenia report being generally willing to adopt protective measures, especially increased hand washing, during a pandemic influenza. Understanding perceived barriers may enable development of effective interventions to increase uptake of protective measures.

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