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Northern grass lizards (Takydromus septentrionalis) from different populations do not differ in thermal preference and thermal tolerance when acclimated under identical thermal conditions.

Authors
  • Yang, Jing
  • Sun, Yan-Yan
  • An, Hong
  • Ji, Xiang
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2008
Volume
178
Issue
3
Pages
343–349
Identifiers
PMID: 18071715
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We acclimated adults of Takydromus septentrionalis (northern grass lizard) from four localities (populations) under identical thermal conditions to examine whether local thermal conditions have a fixed influence on thermal preference and thermal tolerance in the species. Selected body temperature (Tsel), critical thermal minimum (CTMin), and critical thermal maximum (CTMax) did not differ between sexes and among localities in lizards kept under identical laboratory conditions for approximately 5 months, and the interaction effects between sex and locality on these measures were not significant. Lizards acclimated to the three constant temperatures (20, 25, and 35 degrees C) differed in Tsel, CTMin, and CTMax. Tsel, CTMin, and CTMax all shifted upward as acclimation temperature increased, with Tsel shifting from 32.0 to 34.1 degrees C, CTMin from 4.9 to 8.0 degrees C, and CTMax from 42.0 to 44.5 degrees C at the change-over of acclimation temperature from 20 to 35 degrees C. Lizards acclimated to the three constant temperatures also differed in the range of viable body temperatures; the range was widest in the 25 degrees C treatment (38.1 degrees C) and narrowest in the 35 degrees C treatment (36.5 degrees C), with the 20 degrees C treatment in between (37.2 degrees C). The results of this study show that local thermal conditions do not have a fixed influence on thermal preference and thermal tolerance in T. septentrionalis.

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