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Normal platelet function

Authors
  • Holinstat, Michael1, 2
  • 1 University of Michigan, Department of Pharmacology, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, 2220D MSRB III, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5632, USA , Ann Arbor (United States)
  • 2 University of Michigan, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA , Ann Arbor (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer and Metastasis Reviews
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 30, 2017
Volume
36
Issue
2
Pages
195–198
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10555-017-9677-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Platelets play an important role in the vessel. Following their formation from megakaryocytes, platelets exist in circulation for 5–7 days and primarily function as regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis. Following vascular insult or injury, platelets become activated in the blood resulting in adhesion to the exposed extracellular matrix underlying the endothelium, formation of a platelet plug, and finally formation and consolidation of a thrombus consisting of both a core and shell. In pathological conditions, platelets are essential for formation of occlusive thrombus formation and as a result are the primary target for prevention of arterial thrombus formation. In addition to regulation of hemostasis in the vessel, platelets have also been shown to play an important role in innate immunity as well as regulation of tumor growth and extravasations in the vessel. These primary functions of the platelet represent its normal function and versatility in circulation.

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